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Modell's Coupon

posted Nov 20, 2015, 5:48 AM by West Islip Soccer

Just in time for the holidays!

Between November 20 and December 24, make sure you show the coupon below to:

•   Save 15% off all regular and sale merchandise!

•   Your soccer club will receive 5% back of purchases made during your "Team Weeks" shopping period.

•   Earn MVP points while supporting your team!

Keep in mind that the coupon is valid for multiple purchases during your Team Weeks shopping period at any Modell's store on Long Island.  Feel free to share the coupon with your friends & family.

Just print or download the PDF form at the bottom of this page and present it during checkout.

Indoor Clinic

posted Nov 18, 2015, 3:05 PM by West Islip Soccer   [ updated Nov 19, 2015, 8:17 PM ]

Register Now

West Islip Soccer Club will offer an indoor Winter Clinic at the Masera Learning Center gym (650 Udall Rd) for all for U7, U8 & U9/10 intramural players who have registered for the Winter Program.

6 One-hour indoor sessions. One session per week. 

Quality training locally in West Islip for all interested U7, U8, and U9/10 intramural players. 

Session TimesMondaysWednesdays
5:30-6:30Boys U7Girls U7
6:30-7:30Boys U8Girls U8
7:30-8:30Boys U9/10Girls U9/10

Session DatesBoysGirls
Week 1Mon, Dec 7Wed, Dec 9
Week 2Mon, Dec 14Wed, Dec 16
Week 3Mon, Jan 4Wed, Jan 6
Week 4Mon, Jan 11Wed, Jan 13
Week 5Tue, Jan 19Wed, Jan 20
Week 6Mon, Jan 25Wed, Jan 27

Make up dates due to snow and/or school closing will be Tuesdays for boys and Thursdays for girls. 
Alternative make up dates will be Fridays.


Total Cost is $40 (payable online).
Register Now
For more info, email

U9 Academy Spring 2016

posted Nov 18, 2015, 5:48 AM by West Islip Soccer   [ updated Nov 23, 2015, 4:55 AM ]

The Academy program is for U9 players who want extra soccer in addition to their intramural soccer during the Spring season.
  • You MUST be registered with the club's intramural program to take advantage of this program. 
  • Everyone who signs up is accepted into the program. 
  • You play teams from other clubs in the Long Island Junior Soccer League (LIJSL) travel program. Half of your games will be played in West Islip; the other half in towns in Suffolk county. 
  • Scores & standings will be kept. 
  • The $110 cost includes academy style training, LIJSL team & player fees, and paid professional coaching.
  • This program will not replace current team rosters or schedules. 
  • This program will include extra practices and extra games. 
  • ALL communication will be done through email.
  • This program is for the Spring 2015 season.
  • Academy jersey is $20 extra for new academy players (who did not play in the Fall)
Register Now
Register by December 21 for the Spring U9 Academy program.
If you did not participate during the fall, you must submit a birth certificate to the Academy coordinator, Craig Miller, by Dec 21. The Long Island Junior Soccer League (LIJSL) will not let you play without submitting this birth certificate. No exceptions. If you participated during the fall, you do not need to resubmit your birth certificate, since your birth date has already been verified by LIJSL.

Winter U7-U9/10

posted Oct 22, 2015, 1:47 PM by West Islip Soccer   [ updated Nov 17, 2015, 5:48 AM ]

If your child is a current U7-U9/10 INTRAMURAL player and is interested in playing extra soccer during the off season (between the Fall & Spring seasons), you will need to register your child for the winter program.  The intramural winter tournaments/leagues are for those players who want to continue playing while there aren't any league games scheduled. It's extra soccer, and it's optional.

Signing up for this program, means you will be emailed to see if your child wants to participate in upcoming events such as indoor tournaments, practices, and/or a winter indoor league

Registering for the winter program does NOT mean that your child is automatically entered into any indoor tournaments or league. Only those who register for the winter program will be emailed about upcoming winter tournaments/leagues, and will be asked if they're interested in participating. You can participate in as many or few tournaments and/or leagues if you want. .

Based on the number of interested players for an event (such as a tournament), the coaches for that age group will determine whether or not to register a team (or a few teams) for that event. Please understand that your response to the emails determines whether a coach will have enough players or not to register a team. A coach usually pays for these events out of his/her own pocket, and then collects the money from the players. Therefore only say yes to an event, if your child intends on playing.

The $25 fee for this winter registration covers your child's participation in our own West Islip tournament, which is held annually inside the high school and/or middle school gyms in January or February (date TBD). All other events are entirely optional. The cost for all other events will depend on the fee of these other events you decide to participate in and the number of players participating in that event. For example, if a tournament charges $300 per team, and there are 10 players participating on this team, each player is asked to pay $30.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ONLINE (no in-person registration available; register your OWN child only)

Adults interested in coaching need to register online as well.

Registration after Sunday, November 8th will incur an extra $5.

Race to Nowhere

posted Sep 26, 2015, 3:06 PM by West Islip Soccer   [ updated Sep 26, 2015, 3:06 PM ]

The Race to Nowhere in Youth Sports


“My 4th grader tried to play basketball and soccer last year,” a mom recently told me as we sat around the dinner table after one of my speaking engagements. “It was a nightmare. My son kept getting yelled at by both coaches as we left one game early to race to a game in the other sport. He hated it.”

“I know,” said another. “My 10 year old daughter’s soccer coach told her she had to pick one sport, and start doing additional private training on the side, or he would give away her spot on the team.”

So goes the all too common narrative for American youth these days, an adult driven, hyper competitive race to the top in both academics and athletics that serves the needs of the adults, but rarely the kids. As movies such as “The Race to Nowhere” and recent articles such as this one from the Washington Post point out, while the race has a few winners, the course is littered with the scarred psyches of its participants. We have a generation of children that have been pushed to achieve parental dreams instead of their own, and prodded to do more, more, more and better, better, better. The pressure and anxiety is stealing one thing our kids will never get back; their childhood.

The movie and article mentioned above, as well as the book The Overachievers: The Secret Lives of Driven Kids, highlight the dangerous path we have led our children down in academics. We are leading them down a similar path in sports as well.

Empty benchThe path is a race to nowhere, and it does not produce better athletes. It produces bitter athletes who get hurt, burnout, and quit sports altogether.

As I said to my wife recently, the hardest thing about raising two kids these days, when it comes to sports, is that the vast majority of the parents are leading their kids down the wrong path, but not intentionally or because they want to harm their kids. They love their kids, but the social pressure to follow that path is incredible. Even though my wife and I were collegiate athletes, and I spend everyday reading the research, and studying the latest science on the subject, the pressure is immense. The social pressure is like having a conversation with a pathological liar; he is so good at lying that even when you know the truth, you start to doubt it.  Yet that is the sport path many parents are following.

The reason? FEAR!

We are so scared that if we do not have our child specialize, if we do not get the extra coaching, or give up our entire family life for youth sports, our child will get left behind. Even though nearly every single parent I speak to tells me that in their gut they have this feeling that running their child ragged is not helpful, they do not see an alternative. Another kid will take his place.  He won’t get to play for the best coach. “I know he wants to go on the family camping trip,” they say, “but he will just have to miss it again, or the other kids will get ahead of him.”

This system sucks.

It sucks for parents, many of whom do not have the time and resources to keep one child in such a system, never mind multiple athletes. There are no more family trips or dinners, no time or money to take a vacation. It causes parents untold stress and anxiety, as they are made to feel guilty by coaches and their peers if they don’t step in line with everyone else. “You are cheating your kid out of a scholarship” they are told, “They may never get this chance again.”

It sucks for coaches who want to develop athletes for long term excellence, instead of short term success. The best coaches used to be able to develop not only better athletes, but better people, yet it is getting hard to be that type of coach. There are so many coaches who have walked away from sports because while they encourage kids to play multiple sports, other unscrupulous coaches scoop those kids up, and tell them “if you really want to be a player, you need to play one sport year round. That other club is short changing your kid, they are not competitive.” The coach who does it right gives his kids a season off, and next thing you know he no longer has a team.

And yes, most importantly, it sucks for the kids. Any sports scientist or psychologist will tell you that in order to pursue any achievement activity for the long term, children need ownership, enjoyment and intrinsic motivation.  Without these three things, an athlete is very likely to quit.

Children need first and foremost to enjoy their sport. This is the essence of being a child. Kids are focused in the present, and do not think of long term goals and ambitions. But adults do. They see “the opportunities I never had” or “the coaching I wish I had” as they push their kids to their goals and not those of the kids.

They forget to give their kids the one thing they did have: A CHILDHOOD! They forget to give them the ability to find things they are passionate about, instead of choosing for them. They forget that a far different path worked pretty darn well for them.

So why this massive movement, one that defies all science and psychology, to change it?

We need to wise up and find a better path.

Parents, start demanding sports clubs and coaches that allow your kids to participate in many sports. You are the customers, you are paying the bills, so you might as well start buying a product worth paying for. You have science on your side, and you have Long Term Athletic Development best practices on your side. Your kids do not deserve or need participation medals and trophies, as some of you are so fond of saying, but they do deserve a better, more diverse youth sports experience.

Coaches, you need to wise up as well. You are the gatekeepers of youth sports, the people who play God, and decide who gets in, and who is kicked to the curb. You know the incredible influence of sport in your life, so stop denying it to so many others. Are you so worried about your coaching ability, or about the quality of the sport you love, to think that if you do not force kids to commit early they will leave? Please realize that if you are an amazing coach with your priorities in order, and you teach a beautiful game well, that kids will flock to you in droves, not because they have to, but because they want to!

Every time you ask a 9 year old to choose one sport over another you are diminishing participation in the sport you love by 50%. WHY?

To change this we must overcome the fear, the guilt and the shame.

We are not bad parents if our kids don’t get into Harvard, and we are not bad parents if they do not get a scholarship to play sports in college. We should not feel shame or guilt every time our kid does not keep up with the Jones’s, because, when it comes to sports, the Jones’s are wrong.

As this recent article from USA Lacrosse stated, college coaches are actually looking to multi sport athletes in recruiting. Why? Because they have an upside, they are better all around athletes, they are not done developing, and they are less likely to burnout.

You cannot make a kid into something she is not by forcing them into a sport at a very young age, and pursuing your goals and not your child’s goals. Things like motivation, grit, genetics and enjoyment have too much say in the matter.

What you can do, though, is rob a child of the opportunity to be a child, to play freely, to explore sports of interest, to learn to love sports and become active for life.

Chances are great that your children will be done with sports by high school, as only a select few play in college and beyond. Even the elite players are done at an age when they have over half their life ahead of them. It is not athletic ability, but the lessons learned from sport that need to last a lifetime.

Why not expose them to as many of those lifelong lessons as possible?

Why not take a stand?

Why don’t we stop being sheep, following the other sheep down a road to nowhere that both science and common sense tells us often ends badly?

It is time to stop being scared, and stand up for your kids. Read a book on the subject, pass on this article to likeminded people, bring in a speaker to your club and school, but do something to galvanize people to act.

There are more of us who want to do right by the kids than there are those whose egos and wallets have created our current path. We have just been too quite for too long. We have been afraid to speak up, and afraid to take a stand. We are far too willing to throw away our child’s present for some ill fated quest for a better future that rarely materializes, and is often filled with so much baggage that we would never wish for such a future for our kids.

If you think your child will thank you for that, then you probably stopped reading awhile ago.

But if you want to get off the road to nowhere in youth sports, and to stop feeling guilty about it, then please know you are not alone. Our voice is growing stronger every day. We can create a new reality, with new expectations that put the athletes first.

We can put our children on a road to somewhere, one paved with balanced childhoods, exploration, enjoyment, and yes, multiple sports.

Someday our kids will thank us.

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