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Mini Kickers

posted Jan 8, 2016, 5:31 AM by West Islip Soccer   [ updated Jan 8, 2016, 12:15 PM ]

Click HERE to REGISTER

INTRODUCTION

Lenny The LionMini Kickers is a NEW and EXCITING PROGRAM focusing on the development of children aged 2-4 years old.  Our soccer experts and child development professionals have designed an innovative curriculum that introduces your young soccer stars to the basic skills needed in soccer as well as developing their motor, social, and psychological skills.  

Our British coaches are experts at working with young children and will combine soccer with fun games; stories and music that keeps your children entertained and enthused to return next week.  Come join our CUBS AND LIONS PROGRAM and join LENNY THE LION as you learn our Mini Kickers theme song!

Our Mini Kickers program will bring numerous benefits to the children participating in the program. A few of our program highlights are listed below:

  • Qualified Professional British Coaches (Ratio 1:12) with an abundance of experience working with young children and the knowledge of how to make it fun!
  • Innovative curriculum designed by education professionals and child psychologists that focus on the key factors of child development
  • The inclusion of music within the curriculum positively impacts motor skill development, concentration and coordination
  • Player package that includes:-
    • Full custom designed Mini Kickers Uniform (Shirt and Shorts)
    • Mini Kickers size 3 ball
    • Kicker stickers awarded after each session
    • Graduation certificate after level completion
ACADEMY STAFF

Simply put we have the best coaches in North America! Through our extensive coaching network in EUROPE AND SOUTH AMERICA, thousands of coaches apply to work for Challenger Sports. All applicants then go through a detailed Recruitment Process including interviews, coaching sessions, personality tests and background checks before they are selected to work on our British Soccer Camps, TetraBrazil Camps and based on their performance evaluations ONLY THE BEST are selected to work in the CHALLENGER SOCCER ACADEMY
  • PROFESSIONAL INTERNATIONAL STAFF
    • Each year we have over 3,000 applicants from all across the world apply to coach for Challenger Sports.
  • FULLY LICENSED & QUALIFIED
    • Our staff are professionally trained and qualified holding UEFA, Football Association, National Diplomas and / or Brazilian Licenses. On top of their coaching qualifications are staff are up to date with the current First Aid procedures, Child Safety / Safe Haven courses, Nutritional Guidelines and Injury Prevention.
  • FORMER PLAYERS
    • Learn from our staff who live and breathe the game. Many of our staff have played professionally at grass roots up to the professional levels and have over twenty years experience playing and coaching!
  • GREAT ROLE MODELS
    • Not only are our staff top soccer coaches but we also evaluate our coaches abilities to be a leader and a role model to the children they coach. Each of our coaches must complete an in-depth personality test before any employment in your community.
  • EVALUATIONS AND TRAINING
    • All our staff are further educated in our Academy Coaching Curriculum and we also continually evaluate and train our coaching staff once in the USA so that our staff are always up to date with the latest coaching trends, techniques and procedures.
  • BACKGROUND CHECKS
    • Throughout the recruitment process our staff go through in depth assessments, background checks, and visa processing to guarantee we select ONLY THE BEST! 

    See what everyone is saying about our Staff!

View Example Academy Staff Resume

Indoor Clinic II: Feb & Mar

posted Nov 18, 2015, 3:05 PM by West Islip Soccer   [ updated Feb 11, 2016, 5:31 AM ]

http://liwislipsc.siplay.com

Due to popular demand, West Islip Soccer Club will offer a SECOND indoor Winter Clinic in February & March at the Masera Learning Center gym (650 Udall Rd) for all for U7, U8 & U9/10 intramural players who have registered for the Winter Program.

6 One-hour indoor sessions. One session per week. 

Quality training locally in West Islip for all interested U7, U8, and U9/10 intramural players. 

Session Times Mondays Wednesdays
5:30-6:30 Boys U7 Girls U7
6:30-7:30 Boys U8 Girls U8 & U9/10
7:30-8:30 Boys U9/10

Session2 DatesBoysGirls
Week 1Mon, Feb 1Wed, Feb 3
Week 2Mon, Feb 8 Tue, Feb 23Wed, Feb 10
Week 3Mon, Feb 22Wed, Feb 24
Week 4Mon, Feb 29Wed, Mar 2
Week 5Mon, Mar 7Wed, Mar 9
Week 6Mon, Mar 14Wed, Mar 16

Make up dates due to snow and/or school closing will be Tuesdays for boys and Thursdays for girls. 
Alternative make up dates will be Fridays.

LIMITED NUMBER OF SPOTS AND SPACE AVAILABLE

Total Cost is $40 (payable online).
Register Now
For more info, email wintertraining@westislipsoccer.com

Race to Nowhere

posted Sep 26, 2015, 3:06 PM by West Islip Soccer   [ updated Dec 27, 2015, 9:54 AM ]

The Race to Nowhere in Youth Sports

“My 4th grader tried to play basketball and soccer last year,” a mom recently told me as we sat around the dinner table after one of my speaking engagements. “It was a nightmare. My son kept getting yelled at by both coaches as we left one game early to race to a game in the other sport. He hated it.”

“I know,” said another. “My 10 year old daughter’s soccer coach told her she had to pick one sport, and start doing additional private training on the side, or he would give away her spot on the team.”

So goes the all too common narrative for American youth these days, an adult driven, hyper competitive race to the top in both academics and athletics that serves the needs of the adults, but rarely the kids. As movies such as “The Race to Nowhere” and recent articles such as this one from the Washington Post point out, while the race has a few winners, the course is littered with the scarred psyches of its participants. We have a generation of children that have been pushed to achieve parental dreams instead of their own, and prodded to do more, more, more and better, better, better. The pressure and anxiety is stealing one thing our kids will never get back; their childhood.

The movie and article mentioned above, as well as the book The Overachievers: The Secret Lives of Driven Kids, highlight the dangerous path we have led our children down in academics. We are leading them down a similar path in sports as well.

Empty benchThe path is a race to nowhere, and it does not produce better athletes. It produces bitter athletes who get hurt, burnout, and quit sports altogether.

As I said to my wife recently, the hardest thing about raising two kids these days, when it comes to sports, is that the vast majority of the parents are leading their kids down the wrong path, but not intentionally or because they want to harm their kids. They love their kids, but the social pressure to follow that path is incredible. Even though my wife and I were collegiate athletes, and I spend everyday reading the research, and studying the latest science on the subject, the pressure is immense. The social pressure is like having a conversation with a pathological liar; he is so good at lying that even when you know the truth, you start to doubt it.  Yet that is the sport path many parents are following.

The reason? FEAR!

We are so scared that if we do not have our child specialize, if we do not get the extra coaching, or give up our entire family life for youth sports, our child will get left behind. Even though nearly every single parent I speak to tells me that in their gut they have this feeling that running their child ragged is not helpful, they do not see an alternative. Another kid will take his place.  He won’t get to play for the best coach. “I know he wants to go on the family camping trip,” they say, “but he will just have to miss it again, or the other kids will get ahead of him.”

This system sucks.

It sucks for parents, many of whom do not have the time and resources to keep one child in such a system, never mind multiple athletes. There are no more family trips or dinners, no time or money to take a vacation. It causes parents untold stress and anxiety, as they are made to feel guilty by coaches and their peers if they don’t step in line with everyone else. “You are cheating your kid out of a scholarship” they are told, “They may never get this chance again.”

It sucks for coaches who want to develop athletes for long term excellence, instead of short term success. The best coaches used to be able to develop not only better athletes, but better people, yet it is getting hard to be that type of coach. There are so many coaches who have walked away from sports because while they encourage kids to play multiple sports, other unscrupulous coaches scoop those kids up, and tell them “if you really want to be a player, you need to play one sport year round. That other club is short changing your kid, they are not competitive.” The coach who does it right gives his kids a season off, and next thing you know he no longer has a team.

And yes, most importantly, it sucks for the kids. Any sports scientist or psychologist will tell you that in order to pursue any achievement activity for the long term, children need ownership, enjoyment and intrinsic motivation.  Without these three things, an athlete is very likely to quit.

Children need first and foremost to enjoy their sport. This is the essence of being a child. Kids are focused in the present, and do not think of long term goals and ambitions. But adults do. They see “the opportunities I never had” or “the coaching I wish I had” as they push their kids to their goals and not those of the kids.

They forget to give their kids the one thing they did have: A CHILDHOOD! They forget to give them the ability to find things they are passionate about, instead of choosing for them. They forget that a far different path worked pretty darn well for them.

So why this massive movement, one that defies all science and psychology, to change it?

We need to wise up and find a better path.

Parents, start demanding sports clubs and coaches that allow your kids to participate in many sports. You are the customers, you are paying the bills, so you might as well start buying a product worth paying for. You have science on your side, and you have Long Term Athletic Development best practices on your side. Your kids do not deserve or need participation medals and trophies, as some of you are so fond of saying, but they do deserve a better, more diverse youth sports experience.

Coaches, you need to wise up as well. You are the gatekeepers of youth sports, the people who play God, and decide who gets in, and who is kicked to the curb. You know the incredible influence of sport in your life, so stop denying it to so many others. Are you so worried about your coaching ability, or about the quality of the sport you love, to think that if you do not force kids to commit early they will leave? Please realize that if you are an amazing coach with your priorities in order, and you teach a beautiful game well, that kids will flock to you in droves, not because they have to, but because they want to!

Every time you ask a 9 year old to choose one sport over another you are diminishing participation in the sport you love by 50%. WHY?

To change this we must overcome the fear, the guilt and the shame.

We are not bad parents if our kids don’t get into Harvard, and we are not bad parents if they do not get a scholarship to play sports in college. We should not feel shame or guilt every time our kid does not keep up with the Jones’s, because, when it comes to sports, the Jones’s are wrong.

As this recent article from USA Lacrosse stated, college coaches are actually looking to multi sport athletes in recruiting. Why? Because they have an upside, they are better all around athletes, they are not done developing, and they are less likely to burnout.

You cannot make a kid into something she is not by forcing them into a sport at a very young age, and pursuing your goals and not your child’s goals. Things like motivation, grit, genetics and enjoyment have too much say in the matter.

What you can do, though, is rob a child of the opportunity to be a child, to play freely, to explore sports of interest, to learn to love sports and become active for life.

Chances are great that your children will be done with sports by high school, as only a select few play in college and beyond. Even the elite players are done at an age when they have over half their life ahead of them. It is not athletic ability, but the lessons learned from sport that need to last a lifetime.

Why not expose them to as many of those lifelong lessons as possible?

Why not take a stand?

Why don’t we stop being sheep, following the other sheep down a road to nowhere that both science and common sense tells us often ends badly?

It is time to stop being scared, and stand up for your kids. Read a book on the subject, pass on this article to likeminded people, bring in a speaker to your club and school, but do something to galvanize people to act.

There are more of us who want to do right by the kids than there are those whose egos and wallets have created our current path. We have just been too quite for too long. We have been afraid to speak up, and afraid to take a stand. We are far too willing to throw away our child’s present for some ill fated quest for a better future that rarely materializes, and is often filled with so much baggage that we would never wish for such a future for our kids.

If you think your child will thank you for that, then you probably stopped reading awhile ago.

But if you want to get off the road to nowhere in youth sports, and to stop feeling guilty about it, then please know you are not alone. Our voice is growing stronger every day. We can create a new reality, with new expectations that put the athletes first.

We can put our children on a road to somewhere, one paved with balanced childhoods, exploration, enjoyment, and yes, multiple sports.

Someday our kids will thank us.

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